TOW
             
Dreaming; Night of
November 8, 1986

       9:10              1A long series of problems between me and another guy, mostly forgotten. (N)
     2Me and the other guy, years later, having overcome our differences to become good friends. We investigated a crazy old wooden mansion that had been built years before by pirates. It was now in a state of partial ruins and was unsound—the whole house swayed when we (there were others with us as well) first walked on the second floor—and at first we thought that no one lived there any longer. When we opened a closet, however, there stood a man who did. He let us look around a bit more, and we searched for the treasure that was supposed to be hidden there. But, though we found trapdoors and secret passages behind the walls, we found no treasure. Then a shift. I and the other guy were outside about 100 yards from the house, where the ocean met the land. We were diving behind an old sea wall, ostensibly looking for submerged gravel areas that could be mined, but really looking for the treasure. The water was about 12 feet deep there and we were right down on the bottom. I don't remember using any special (SCUBA) equipment, either. We located several small patches of gravel, which we marked so we could return to them, and then I uncovered an old crawfish skeleton. Digging in the mire of the site, I found several others, one positively bursting with flesh. It was obvious that they had been preserved thus in the silt for a long time, and I hypothesized that the pirates might have buried some of their enemies, or even some of their own number, on top of their treasure to protect it, and that this would have attracted a large number of crawfish, which I knew to be rare in the area, some of which would have died there, perhaps of overeating. I believed that just by digging down further, we would discover first the skeletons of the dead men and then the treasure. (One flaw in either my reasoning or in my mind's dream-plotting that I can note in retrospect: the crawfish husks were all red, signifying that they had all at one time been boiled.) (G)